Then & Now: 7 Years In Practice

Ever since we moved into our office around March 2010 and opened our practice the following month, both my partner (in both practice and marriage) and I have felt an overwhelming sense of a time-warp.

Somehow, time supernaturally speeds up the minute we walk through the office door, and returns to its normal clip the moment we leave.

This applies across all common measurement units of time, too–minutes, hours, days, weeks, months, and now, years.  Thus, even though it’s cliche to say that it’s hard to believe it’s been 7 years, we mean it: it actually is hard to believe.

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When it rains, it pours

Sometimes, one can make the healthiest, most positive changes with the best of intentions and it will still backfire.  And what’s more is, unpleasant events often happen in waves.  (Pleasant events probably do, too, but the unpleasant ones are much easier to remember.)

That’s exactly what happened, and I’m not sure it’s over yet.

Continue reading When it rains, it pours

And you give yourself away…and you give…and you give

Yes, that’s in honor of the hit song “With or Without You” by U2.

So sue me (grin).

I’m not a martyr.  I’m not someone to burn themselves out and say, “poor me, look at what all I do for everyone else!”  And yet that’s exactly what I ended up doing.  I didn’t intend to, not by a long shot.  But I did anyway.  Live and learn…

Continue reading And you give yourself away…and you give…and you give

First-year learning curve – Part 2

Wow, that last post started getting long – it didn’t feel like we’d learned that much in one year alone, but apparently we did–and more!  The rest follows below…

Learn to say no–fast.  This applies to salespeople requesting meetings, verifying those bogus “Yellow Pages” directory listings, and local vendors selling fruit out of the back of the pickup truck in your parking lot.

This also goes for patients who continually fail to show up, people who are repeatedly late, people who “forgot their wallet/credit card/checkbook”, or people who will “square up later” once their insurance is verified (many docs will tell a first-day patient not to worry about that day’s initial exam fees for now, we’ll just apply it to insurance – I say do not take this route!).

Continue reading First-year learning curve – Part 2